Free 

 

 Holiday ideas & Crafts banner
The History of Independence Day
Happy Fouth of JulyOn June 11, 1776, the colonies' Second Continental Congress meeting in Philadelphia formed a committee with the express purpose of drafting a document that would formally sever their ties with Great Britain. The committee included Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, Roger Sherman and Robert R. Livingston. The document was crafted by Jefferson, who was considered the strongest and most eloquent writer. The final version was officially adopted by the Continental Congress on July 4.

The Declaration of Independence has since become our nation's most cherished symbol of liberty.


On July 8, 1776, the first public readings of the Declaration were held in Philadelphia's Independence Square to the ringing of bells and band music. One year later, on July 4, 1777, Philadelphia marked Independence Day by adjourning Congress and celebrating with bonfires, bells and fireworks.

The custom eventually spread to other towns, both large and small, where the day was marked with processions, oratory, picnics, contests, games, military displays and fireworks. Observations throughout the nation became even more common at the end of the War of 1812 with Great Britain.

Independence Day Symbols: The Liberty Bell is a treasured relic of the early days of American independence. It was rung July 8, 1776, with other church bells, to announce the adoption of the Declaration of Independence. Its inscription, "Proclaim Liberty throughout all the land unto all the inhabitants thereof," is from the Bible.

The term "Uncle Sam" was used as early as 1813. The costume of Uncle Sam, decorated with stars and stripes, originated in cartoons of the 1830's and 1840's. But the figure did not assume its present form until after the Civil War (1861-1865). In 1961, Congress passed a resolution saluting Samuel Wilson as the person who inspired America's national symbol.

Independence Day fireworks are often accompanied by patriotic songs. Firework shows are held in many states, and many fireworks are sold for personal use or as an alternative to a public show. 

Independence Day Customs:  On July 4, 1976 major celebrations throughout the country marked America’s 200th birthday. In Washington, D.C., 33 tons of fireworks were exploded in the sky above the Washington Monument, along with Laser beams that spelled out " 1776-1976, Happy Birthday, USA." In New York, a succession of tall sailing ships from all over the world sailed up the Hudson River.

Today, communities across the nation mark this major midsummer holiday with parades, fireworks, picnics and the playing of the "Star Spangled Banner" and marches by John Philip Sousa. Families often celebrate Independence Day by hosting or attending a picnic or barbecue and take advantage of the day off.

A salute of one gun for each state in the United States, called a “salute to the union,” is fired on Independence Day at noon by any capable military base.

Like Free Holiday Ideas and Crafts on Facebook.  We are your one stop website for Free ideas to create holiday and party crafts and decorations 

On July 8, 1776, the first public readings of the Declaration were held in Philadelphia's Independence Square to the ringing of bells and band music. One year later, on July 4, 1777, Philadelphia marked Independence Day by adjourning Congress and celebrating with bonfires, bells and fireworks. The custom eventually spread to other towns, both large and small, where the day was marked with processions, oratory, picnics, contests, games, military displays and fireworks. Observations throughout the nation became even more common at the end of the War of 1812 with Great Britain.
Starts: 07/04/2014 12:00AM
Ends: 2014-07-05:00.000 Duration: 23:59
United States

Reality Radio Business Directory